Dalrada Health

Cervical Cancer Awareness: A Historical View
Cervical Cancer Awareness Month is observed every January to raise awareness of research, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship. 
Teal is the official color of Cervical Cancer Awareness Month, and shows support for:
  • Aiding women in their quest to eliminate Cervical cancer.
  • Proactively preventing Cervical cancer around the world.
  • Addressing the life-threatening condition the disease presents.
  • Honoring the women who fought valiantly against the disease.

Cervical cancer’s cause and effects impact women, families, and communities.

Women’s healthcare industry pioneers and innovators have played major roles in creating care standards to advance Cervical cancer prevention and treatment. Historical milestones include:
  • 1886 – Sir John Williams’ official discovery of a cervical lesion
  • 1920 – Dr. Papanicolaou (“Pap”) distinguishes normal and malignant cervical epithelium on microscope slides
  • 1928 – Dr. Pap presents findings to colleagues
  • 1939 – Drs. Pap, Traut, Marchetti collaborate
  • Early 1940s – Pap smear test introduced
  • 1943 – Cervical cancer detection resource guide “Diagnosis of Uterine Cancer by the Vaginal Smear” published
  • 1949 – Ayre Spatula cervical scraper patented by Dr. Ayre, who donates sale proceeds to the American Cancer Society
  • 1960s – Cervical cancer screening programs introduced
  • 1969 – Incidences more than halved, from 21.6 per 100,000 women (USA, Canada)
  • 1970s – Cervical cancer occurrence plateau
  • 1976 – Cervical cancer task force organizes screening programs (Canada)
  • 1990 – Incidences reach 10.4 per 100,000 (USA, Canada)
  • 2000s – Instances reduced more than 50% since program introduction
  • 2003 – “Pap smear” becomes standard of care (USA)
  • 2020 – cerVIA™ visual inspection with acetic acid test patent filed (Dalrada Health)
  • 2020 – WHO launches the “World Without Cervical Cancer” initiative
  • 2021 – cerVIA™ surpasses Pap smear effectiveness in clinical trials (India)

The global mortality rate of Cervical cancer is estimated to be one death every two minutes. A deeper look reveals that deaths occurs more frequently, unfortunately. According to a United Nations study, in 2020, an estimated 604,000 women were diagnosed with Cervical cancer worldwide, and 342,000 died from the preventable disease.

Imagine one standard professional football stadium and filling it to maximum seating capacity. Next, line up ten of those stadiums side-by-side. This represents the number of women diagnosed with Cervical cancer in just one year. Similarly, filling nearly six stadiums equals the number of women who lose their lives to this disease in one year.

Screening Reduces the Burden of Cervical Cancer

Developing countries tend to shoulder the global burden of Cervical cancer. There is no (or severely limited) access to Pap smear screening in these countries or the highly-trained healthcare providers, laboratory technicians, and advanced healthcare diagnostic equipment that this modality requires.

As a practical alternative, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends VIA (visual inspection with acetic acid) tests for proactive screening in its “World Without Cervical Cancer” plan.

VIA is a versatile, accessible, and most importantly, accurate methodology for Cervical cancer detection that functions as a viable second opinion for all other screening test types. 

Particularly for medical resource-limited countries, standardized VIA screening kits streamline procedural efficiencies in clinical settings and deliver immediate results.

Cervical cancer prevention and early detection with VIA screening provide more than hope; it gives precious time to practitioners, patients, and families.

Join the quest to eliminate cervical cancer by raising awareness, supporting research, education, prevention, and treatment. 

divider

DALRADA
LATEST NEWS

Cervical Cancer Awareness: A Historical View
Cervical Cancer Awareness Month is observed every January to raise awareness of research, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship. 
Teal is the official color of Cervical Cancer Awareness Month, and shows support for:
  • Aiding women in their quest to eliminate Cervical cancer.
  • Proactively preventing Cervical cancer around the world.
  • Addressing the life-threatening condition the disease presents.
  • Honoring the women who fought valiantly against the disease.

Cervical cancer’s cause and effects impact women, families, and communities.

Women’s healthcare industry pioneers and innovators have played major roles in creating care standards to advance Cervical cancer prevention and treatment. Historical milestones include:
  • 1886 – Sir John Williams’ official discovery of a cervical lesion
  • 1920 – Dr. Papanicolaou (“Pap”) distinguishes normal and malignant cervical epithelium on microscope slides
  • 1928 – Dr. Pap presents findings to colleagues
  • 1939 – Drs. Pap, Traut, Marchetti collaborate
  • Early 1940s – Pap smear test introduced
  • 1943 – Cervical cancer detection resource guide “Diagnosis of Uterine Cancer by the Vaginal Smear” published
  • 1949 – Ayre Spatula cervical scraper patented by Dr. Ayre, who donates sale proceeds to the American Cancer Society
  • 1960s – Cervical cancer screening programs introduced
  • 1969 – Incidences more than halved, from 21.6 per 100,000 women (USA, Canada)
  • 1970s – Cervical cancer occurrence plateau
  • 1976 – Cervical cancer task force organizes screening programs (Canada)
  • 1990 – Incidences reach 10.4 per 100,000 (USA, Canada)
  • 2000s – Instances reduced more than 50% since program introduction
  • 2003 – “Pap smear” becomes standard of care (USA)
  • 2020 – cerVIA™ visual inspection with acetic acid test patent filed (Dalrada Health)
  • 2020 – WHO launches the “World Without Cervical Cancer” initiative
  • 2021 – cerVIA™ surpasses Pap smear effectiveness in clinical trials (India)

The global mortality rate of Cervical cancer is estimated to be one death every two minutes. A deeper look reveals that deaths occurs more frequently, unfortunately. According to a United Nations study, in 2020, an estimated 604,000 women were diagnosed with Cervical cancer worldwide, and 342,000 died from the preventable disease.

Imagine one standard professional football stadium and filling it to maximum seating capacity. Next, line up ten of those stadiums side-by-side. This represents the number of women diagnosed with Cervical cancer in just one year. Similarly, filling nearly six stadiums equals the number of women who lose their lives to this disease in one year.

Screening Reduces the Burden of Cervical Cancer

Developing countries tend to shoulder the global burden of Cervical cancer. There is no (or severely limited) access to Pap smear screening in these countries or the highly-trained healthcare providers, laboratory technicians, and advanced healthcare diagnostic equipment that this modality requires.

As a practical alternative, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends VIA (visual inspection with acetic acid) tests for proactive screening in its “World Without Cervical Cancer” plan.

VIA is a versatile, accessible, and most importantly, accurate methodology for Cervical cancer detection that functions as a viable second opinion for all other screening test types. 

Particularly for medical resource-limited countries, standardized VIA screening kits streamline procedural efficiencies in clinical settings and deliver immediate results.

Cervical cancer prevention and early detection with VIA screening provide more than hope; it gives precious time to practitioners, patients, and families.

Join the quest to eliminate cervical cancer by raising awareness, supporting research, education, prevention, and treatment. 

divider

DALRADA
LATEST NEWS

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